Posts Tagged ‘Dali’

"Blue Love" Oil on canvas, framed

“Blue Love”
Oil on canvas, framed

“But dear, don’t be afraid of love, it’s only magic.”

Advertisements

I have always been fascinated by Dali’s work. He is a mad genius, like many other… like Da Vinci, Einstein and so on…

Image

So, while in Paris and visiting Espace Dali, i saw illustration of tarot cards. Honestly i was shocked, but in a good way… now i am obsession over a way as to how to get such tarot cards 🙂 Only Dali could do such a great job illustrating these, just like illustrating Dante Alighieri “Divine Comedy”… only such mad genius like Dali can make tarot cards priceless possession! Brava Salvatore Dali! 

ImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImagetImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImage

Christmas in Paris what can be better… While in Paris i could not miss Espace Dali, on Montmartre.

Image

Image

The terminology, “the crown of a watch” usually indicates a mechanical device which allows us to set the hands and wind the time peace. Time, however, according to  Dalinian watch, is changeless and cannot be set, and the watch itself has no internal power of motion. given the absence of movement, the crown in this case is interpreted by the artist as a royal crown which adorns the watch, identifies time’s mastery over human beings rather than its utility to him. his majesty is attended by two reoccurring, fantastical Dalinian symbols: a contemplative angel, and a woman draped in shawls look on. Time reigns supreme over both art and reality.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Today I will continue with my Salvador Dali fascination. 

Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri is an epic poem, that is accepted world wide as one of the greatest masterpieces of art. It comes as no surprise that  in 1950 another great artist, Salvador Dali, would have been asked by the Italian government to produce a series of illustrations for a full-text, deluxe edition of the Divine Comedy. Ultimately, the illustrations were not well received by the Italians, as it was deemed inappropriate for a Spanish painter (rather than Italian painter) to have illustrated the masterpiece of Italy’s greatest poet. 

Even though the project was dropped in Italy, Dali and French publisher Joseph Foret continued to pursue publication of The Divine Comedy. Mr. Foret acted as a broker between salvador Dali and Les Heures Claires, a French editing and publishing house that ultimately took full charge of the project. Jean Estrade, the Artistic Director, worked closely with expert engravers to create the works under Dali’s supervision. Wood engraving was the medium chosen due to its ability to recreate subtle washes and delicate lines.

The Divine Comedy suite consists of 100 color wood engravings created between 1960 and 1964 after 100 watercolors painted between 1951 and 1960. Mr. Raymond Jacquet and his assistant Mr. Tarrico created the engravings with the participation and final approval by Dali. More than 3 000 blocks were necessary to complete the engraving process. 

Once the project was complete, all the Divine Comedy blocks were distorted. the engraving process required the block to be cut, a single color applied, than printed to the substrate (e.g. paper, silk, etc.). The block was then cleaned and cut away for the next color. As the engravings were made, the image was progressively “printed”, and the block was progressively distorted. The process required great skill and resulted in works of spectacular beauty which can not be reproduced in a manner that is not detectable as a reproduction, even to the casual observer.

So here is the actual illustrations of the engravings grouped in 3 chapters: Inferno – Purgatory – Paradise

Inferno:

 

Purgatory:

 

Paradise:

Source of illustrations: http://www.rogallery.com/Dali_Salvador/divine_comedy/sdalihm-hell.htm

I have always been fascinated by surrealism and Salvador Dali in particular. When i look at his art it always makes me think about human subconsciousness and psychology.

One of my friends has a copy of Salvador Dali sketch “City of drawers” (1936), and i just fell in love with it!

“City of drawers” makes use of the psychoanalytical reference of Austrian psychologist Sigmund Freud; “City of drawers” like “The Burning Giraffe” has sets of drawers, which fits in with Dali’s quote: “the only difference between the immortal Greece and contemporary times is Sigmund Freud, who discovered that the human body, purely platonic at the Greece epoch, nowadays, is full of secret drawers that only psychoanalysis is capable of opening.”

myWPEdit Image

I found an interesting site that talks about art, here is the link for people that might find it interesting:

http://www.all-art.org/art20thcentury/dali-3-2.html



[“The Secret Drawers of the Unconscious

The drawers that open out of Dali’s human and other figures have become as universally familiar as his soft watches. The Venus de Milo with Drawers or The Anthropomorphic Cabinet have imprinted indelibly Dahnian images on the visual memories of millions. Before painting the latter, Dali did a number of detailed preparatory pencil and ink drawings. The painting was conceived as a homage to the psychoanalytic theories of Freud, whom Dali (unsurprisingly) revered. Dali viewed his own subject matter as an allegorical means of tracing the countless narcissistic fragrances that waft up from every one of our drawers (as he put it). And he declared that the sole difference between immortal Greece and the present day was Sigmund Freud, who had discovered that the human body, purely neo-Platonic at the time of the Greeks, was now full of secret drawers which only psychoanalysis could pull open. Dali was familiar with the furniture figures made by the 17th century Italian Mannerist Giovanni Battista Bracelli, and they doubtless influenced his own figures with drawers. For Bracelli, though, furniture figures were a game played with geometry and space, sheer jeu d’esprit, while for Dali, three centuries later, a similar approach expressed the central, obsessive urge to understand human identity.”]

[Ant Face. Drawing for the Catalogue Jacket of Dali’s Exhibition at the Alex Reid and Lefevre Gallery in London 1936]

myWPEdit Image

[Woman with Drawers]

myWPEdit Image

[Venus de Milo with Drawers 1936]

myWPEdit Image

[The Anthropomorphic Cabinet 1936]

myWPEdit Image